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palestinian status at the u.n.; reading the fine print; tackling immigration reform and re-purposing digital data gathered during the campaign. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street tracked the ups and downs of the fiscal cliff drama in washington today. at one point, the dow jones industrial average was off more than 100 points. but stocks made up the ground after the president's talk of a deal by christmas. the dow ended with a gain of nearly 107 points to close at 12,985. the nasdaq rose 24 points to close well over 2,991. a moderate republican senator susan collins of maine voiced new concerns today about u.n. ambassador susan rice. it stemmed from rice's initial account, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by
states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
the ambassador. he wants to push the issue into play at the u.n., he's summoned the arab league. morisi does not he ban to attach himself to hamas let alone to the jihaddist groups, smaller ones that are operating in gaza. he has a loan that they are negotiating, a billion-plus in military assistance from the united states. he's got multiple audiences on this. he's going to appear supportive. the question is can he bring his influence? remember, the muslim brotherhood is in fact the foundation stone from which hamas emerged. he does have influence with hamas. they share a common border. hamas has to give some credibility to what he wants and to what he said. the question is, how much time do we have before this escalates to a ground incursion? jon: the palestinians profess they want their own state. hard to argue that you deserve statehood when you're launching rockets at your neighbor. >> you have three states between the mediterranean and the jordan river. have you a weak and dysfunctional palestinian authority which controls 40% of the west bank. you have a highly centralized hamas which
the waiting is the very worst part for the young part they are g u.n. g-ho they want to go in. for the older soldiers they know that some of the men they are with in these camps, eating, telling jokes and of course trailing with won't come home alive. the air war entered day six with pounding targets inside gaza. many of the targets hit were weapons depose. so far the israeli air force has hit 1300 targets killing 100 palestinians including a family of eleven which was a targeting gone wrong. this has hurt israel's days for its continued defensive. meanwhile the israeli president facebooked this home video of a family taking cover in tel-aviv main park, a father comforting his crying babies as hamas rockets fly overhead. tonight in cairo the cease-fire talks continue mediated by the egyptian intelligence service and the latest reports from there suggest there is progress being made but megyn tonight we are far from any ink on a deal that would at some point prevent these canyon, the artillery, tanks and infantry that we've seen from heading over the hills into the gaza strip to begin the gro
-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil in egypt. we will have a live report from washington. >> gregg: new signs of tough challenges ahead for gaza. number two leader of hamas now saying the group will not stop arming itself. a commented suggesting that indirect negotiations on the border deal could be very difficult. in the meantime, life at the gaza strip returning to normal after the week long strikes. tens of those of children heading back to school. cease-fire appears to be holding. conner powell with more on that. >> reporter: this is still fragile cease-fire.
politically charged controversy is over u.n. ambassador susan rice's comments five days after the attack. why she blamed it on benghazi demonstrations, officials now say didn't even happen. and why she didn't mention terrorist forces? intelligence officials now believe actually targeted the u.s. consulate there. democrats emerge saying the answer was simple, she was using these unclassified cia talking points which omitted mention of extremist elements because it was still classified and could have compromised intelligence sources. >> she used the unclassified talking points that were signed off on by the entire intelligence community, so criticisms of her are completely unwarranted. >> reporter: democrats accuse republicans of unnecessarily assassinating rice's character. >> to select ambassador rice because she used an unclassified talking point, to say that she is unqualified to be secretary of state i think is a mistake. >> reporter: but republicans say the problem is rice freelanced. >> she went beyond that. and she even mentioned that under the leadership of barack obama we have decimat
the diplomacy route, we're also expecting u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon. also the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abb abbas. we do not know if he'll be meeting with any hamas officials. he most certainly is not expected to be making a trip to gaza. another explosion again in the distance. we're hearing sirens from the streets below.happening, we are expecting a trip from the 16 foreign ministers, the members of the arab league as well as the turkish foreign minister. certainly a lot of movement on the diplomatic front, but we're stillen continuing to hear e explosi explosions. >> i'm sure people very accustomed to noises like that. arwa damon, thank you. >>> israeli president shimon peres says he is concerned about stopping the iranians from sending long-range missiles to hamas. peres telling piers morgan he sees two distinct story lines developing in this gaza conflict. one positive, one negative. >> the positive is the constructive wall that the egyptian president is playing right now, and we appreciate very much his efforts. the other is the iranians. they
diane feinstein defendeded u.n. ambassador susan rice. >> he made it clear that there was significant terrorist involvement. that is not my recollection of what he told us september 14th. >> to say that she is unqualified to be secretary of state i think is a mistake. and the way it keeps going, it's almost as if the intent is to assess nate -- >> joining me now is karen finny a political analyst and armstrong williams a conservative columnist and host of the right side with armstrong williams. hello to you both. good to see you. >> hi, alex. >> ladies first with you, karen. you just heard from congressman king. one of his biggest complaints was the white house held back information that this was a terrorist attack claiming this was classified. this is different from the white house's initial defense that they did call it a terrorist attack right away. are they changing their tune? >> well, what i find interesting is the way congressman king and a number of the other republicans have changed their tune from the night before the briefing and oh, what a difference it makes when you actu
right now. meanwhile after petraeus' testimony before congress, a big battle is brewing over u.n. ambassador susan rice's declassified talking points on the attack in benghazi. specifically why the role of terrorism wasn't reflected in them. democratic senator dianne feinstein, the chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee, says she'll investigate why the terrorist role wasn't included. still in an appearance on nbc's meet the press, feinstein said she was sure the white house didn't change the language in those talking points. >> with the allegation that the white house changed those talking points, that is false. there's only one thing that was changed. and i checked into this. i believe it to be absolute fact. and that was the word counsel was changed to mission. that's the only change that anyone in the white house made. and i have checked this out. >> republicans are accusing the obama administration of a cover-up and want ambassador rice to testify before congress. >> it's going to be one tough confirmation hearing. all right coming up, president obama on his way to c
: the president is being warned against promoting u.n. ambassador susan rice. under fire about her incorrect statements about what happened in benghazi, but democrats say the attacks on rice are about race and gender. we will talk to kelly ayotte and see what she thinks about that. bill: feeling the heat from a major -- >> we don't have the estimate on the grid impact, we are still working on that. if you look through the downtown area the majority of it is dark except for the people who do have generators. there is a fairly substantial impact. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteopo
. >> primarily subsaharan africa and around the world. >> around the world. the goal for hiv, there is a u.n. report that came out that is really saying hiv is -- it's not, you know, overcoming hiv is not just a dream. it's really going to become a reality if we continue on the investments and efforts we've been making. >> well, at this point, how many health care professionals do you think you can afford to send into the field? >> so we've actually committed to sending 30 to 36 doctors and nurses abroad. so about 12 into each country. we're starting three countries. malawi, tanzania and uganda. it's not a question of how many we can afford, how many should we send in the first year and really do we think to begin to make sort of -- really see on the ground taking care of patients and making a real difference to the places they're working and we as the non-profit of global service corps have committed to raising the funds to be able to do that. we need people's help. we'll encourage people to go to our website and to make a contribution and to be a part of this mission with us. this is -- it
as the rebels pushed into the city. some 1,500 u.n. peacekeepers and armor stood aside, and did not try to block the advance. congo has accused neighboring rwanda of backing the rebels in an effort to control the region's mineral wealth. federal prosecutors in new york announced charges today in what could be the single biggest insider trading payoff ever. mathew martoma allegedly used confidential information about an alzheimer's drug to make more than a quarter-billion dollars. at the time, in 2006, he managed a hedge fund portfolio. for more, we turn to david voreacos of bloomberg news. >> thank you for having me. sreenivasan: first off how did this alleged scream work. what kind of information was being traded? >> well, the prosecutors today in new york allege that a hedge fund advisor at f.a.c. capital advisors in connecticut which is run by billiaire seve cohe gathered inside information about an alzheimers cli.$kal drug trial that was being conducted. based on that information he built a position of $700 million in the two drug companies that were running the trial. through his connection
should defend israel and the court of world preponderance, whether it is in the u.n. or other international forums and insist that the real story come out. it is hamas that has been on the offensive. israel has practiced so much patience and reluctance to go into gaza, until these rockets, as you have indicated, have come into jerusalem and the escalation with rockets coming into tel aviv and other population centers there. we have an obligation. the president has an obligation, thus far, the white house has acted in a way that i believe the israelis can see that america stands by us. certainly, in the past, last couple of years, there has been a questions in my mind about whether where the president and the white house stand as far as the u.s./israel relationship. i am glad to see what they have said this week. i hope it holds. >> greta: talking about a -- i don't know if that gets us clocloser to a solution. i don't pretend to know the solution. but i see that egypt -- president morsi has -- has gotten involved. i see this getting more complicated, an already complicated sit
terms, then yes, somebody will welcome u.n. and welcome your big ships in, then maybe you might be able just to pull it off and still have something in the indian ocean and the eastern mediterranean. and by the way, it isn't just the defense ships but if there's any kind of problems you have to send other ships there. so the numbers don't add up that way. in terms of michele's direct question, you know, how do we deal with this, after all, this is a much larger problem. don't forget, the national debt right now is $10 trillion, give or take. if the sequestered it, that's 54.6, correct me, you're the one who knows it to the nearest 10th of a bill i think it is 54.6 billion for each of nine years. 54.6 billion off of 10 trillion? think about that. how big he didn't are you making in the national debt? now why am i looking at the debt? because the budget is a fraction of the problem. the problem is entitlement. it is not defense. defense is practically a rounding error. so if you want to go ahead and trade defense as a hostage to the issues that have to be dealt with, go right ahead. but t
joins me now, former ambassador to the u.n. and fox news contributor. good morning to you. >> good morning, martha, glad to be with you. >> what do you think? >> i think there is an amazing difference between what happens after november 6th and our election and what happened before it. as you were asking before how is it that the allen investigation is treated so much differently than the petraeus investigation, a lot of facts we don't know, but certainly this is post november the 6th and whatever the political consequences, they are very attenuated for the president. i think the real issue of course we need to go back to ultimately is benghazi and what happened on september the 11th. but i think also this question of how politicized our national security has become under the obama administration and the effort to push everything past november the 6th really now is something that congress and other political leaders need to focus on. martha: i want to ask you about all these emails and what these folks are up to and how they've got all this time to do this stuff. the first question
diplomats are coming to israel and to 9 region, not just the u.n. secretary-general, but the u.s. secretary of state as you've just said has been dispatched by president obama to meet face-to-face with the principles in this conflict. the prime minister of israel, the president of egypt who is taking the lead in organizing these cease-fire negotiations from the hamas side with israel. soledad? >> christiane, that sounds like the short-term option, right? you sort of try to hold everything down while you negotiate some kind of a short-term peace. what are people saying about the longer-term options here? >> well, you know, there's a lot of devil in the details, as always. you know, each side wants to make sure it's not just a short-term. it's a long-term option. because on the one hand, israel wants a long-term solution to the rockets that are being fired into israel, and into threatening the residents of that area of southern israel close to gaza. on the other hand, the hamas and the palestinians in gaza want a long-term solution to lifting the siege of gaza, and also want a promise, a pled
a letter to barack obama on monday saying the u.n. ambassador susan rice miss led the nation about the attack on the united states consulate in libya. looking at one of last news item from politico, congressman alan west, if republican, has conceded florida's 18th district. this in a statement to politico -- the republican had been challenging the vote counting process and st. lucie county. we were watching to see how that was resolved. allen west conceding that race. thank you for all of your calls. on thursday morning, one of our first segment at 7:45 will be speaking to a professor at the university of maryland. there will give some insight into the current situation in the middle east. that is all for this segment. coming up next, we will look to the effort to rebuild and fix up the damage in the wake of hurricane sandy. the wall street journal's andrew grossman will join us for that. thomas ricks will be here to talk about that. we will be right back. ♪ >> , there are many people who might take issue with a grand setting the union during the civil war. did not lay gannett do
at the u.n. and in egypt to finally reach a truce here. we asked abc's christiane amanpour in jerusalem, where diplomatic efforts now stands. >> reporter: the gang of nine are meeting the prime minister and senior advisers and cabinet to try to figure out how to respond to a proposal put forward by egypt. so the effort is really under way to have a diplomatic solution. whether it works or not we are waiting to see. all the american efforts are going through egypt, when it comes to hamas. they're taking the lead. from what we understand, egypt wants to have a cease-fire, then a bigger negotiation about lifting the siege of gaza. hamas wants that all to be part of one agreement. and israel wants to see a stop of hostilities, no more rockets into israel and doesn't want to link that to a cease-fire. so those are the parameters. how they get close together to make a success of this is really what's under way right now. >> thank you, christiane am afternoon pour, reporting from jerusalem. the "l.a. times" did a great story on this, summed up the heart of the conflict here. and it says -- any
. democrats say this explains why u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice said after the attack that it was a mob protesting and anti-muslim video and not a terror strike but republicans contend the obama administration wanted to downplay terrorism from the start. >> the issue is from what was released from c.i.a. headquarters on friday afternoon in an unclassified memo to the point it was changed to the sunday morning talk shows there is a gap we need to account for and understand why it was changed. >> all the intelligence community have told us that initially they recognize there were terrorists involved but they thought it came from the protests, that it took time to sort that out. >> molly: c.i.a. talking points would have gone through numerous hands, various intelligence agencies, white house, state department, justice department before going out to lawmakers. >> gregg: so nobody is terribly forthcoming about who did it. molly henneberg, thanks very much. >> heather: illegal immigration a hot button issue and today we understand that republican lawmakers are now working on
on the one hand to not take their decision to push for statehood to the u.n. on november 28, that is why secretary of state clinton met with barack obama earlier today, if you think you can get them to control the thoughts and so there is no more rocket fire out, then we won't send him those roundtrips. but this is a very tenuous agreement at best at the way the different parties and what they have agreed to. megyn: you make it sound like an egg shell -- an egg shell peas. even those who call themselves jihadist can crack themselves by one gunshot and the deal is off. benjamin netanyahu is going to speak momentarily, so we will find out when the english translation will come. earlier you reported that it was unusual for israel to agree to a peace deal like this on a day in which a bus attack happened in tel aviv. when you say that? >> well, i think it's very unusual. that is a position of weakness. if you have a situation where a bomb has gone off on a bus in tel aviv, the first time there's been a terror attack since 2006 in tel aviv, the first bus bombings since 2004 in tel aviv, that
relations with israel, the role of the security council and in the city council in the u.n. almost everything important is at stake in this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at in the wind while this year is critical we have to realize this isn't all about some misunderstanding or fixable problem with iran not to getting about its civil nuclear program or even its nuclear weapons program colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we and the rest of the region has with iran at least since the 1970's and this confrontation will go on regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or have a strike to prevent iran from moving to that nuclear weapons capability. we are going to have to deal with this problem over the longer term just as we have the last 30 years because it flows from kuran's view of its role in the region and the inconsistency of the view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values and our role both in t
, the role of the security council, and our role in the security council in the u.n. system. almost everything that's important is at stake with this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at it, though, and while this year is critical, as den sis said, we have to realize this is not all about some misunderstanding or some fixable problem with iran not getting it about itself civil nuclear program or colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we, and the rest of the west and the region had with iran as least since the 1970s. this will go on, regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or we have a strike to prevent iran from moving to the nuclear weapons capability. we're going to have to deal with this problem over the long term just as we have over the last 30 years because it flows from iran's view of its role in the region and inconsistency of that view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values, and our role, bot
vowing to block u.n. ambassador susan rice is she is nominated by the president to be the n-secretary of state. graham said he doesn't trust her because she went on tv after the attack at the u.s. consulate with information he says simply turned out to be false. >> something else i want to ask you about. there are three separate hearings going on on the issue of benghazi. yet, senators mccain and lindsey graham want a watergate style select committee hearing on this affair. what is that, and is it likely to happen? >> they're saying there are too many different committees and disparate committees investigating. they call it stove piping and they want it to be all consolidated into one special select committee. watergate was an example. they also give the example of the 9/11 commission. is that likely to happen? the answer at this point is likely no because even the top republican in congress, house speaker john boehner yesterday threw cold water on it saying he doesn't think it's necessary and the top democrat in the senate says the same thing, and others, as well. i have to
going forward, rick. rick: conor powell live on the ground in jerusalem, thanks. heather: well, u.n. ambassador susan rice defending those early comments on the benghazi terror attacks just days after the raid on the u.s. consulate. ambassador rice went on five sunday talk shows and said that the attack grew out of a spontaneous to protest over an anti-muslim film. and now she says those remarks were based on the intelligence she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. heather: national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live from washington with the latest. hi, jennifer. >> reporter: hi, heather. well, essentially, she came out now was it's increasingly -- because it's increasingly clear that the president wants to nominate her to be his next secretary of state despite strong objections from senators such as john mccain. >> i have
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)